Recently updated

Radio DJ Mark Goodier praises wife's action after surviving a stroke

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 03:00Thu, 02/02/2017 - 03:10
Radio broadcaster Mark Goodier survived a stroke in November thanks to the quick actions of his wife.
Radio broadcaster Mark Goodier, 55, survived a stroke in November thanks to the quick actions of his wife.
Mark is now slowly getting back to work and returning to a normal pace of life.
Mark, a former Radio 1 chart show DJ and Top of the Pops presenter, is now slowly getting back to work and returning to a normal pace of life.

Facebook loses $500m Oculus virtual reality case

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 01:05Thu, 02/02/2017 - 02:35
A US court has put Facebook on the hook for $500m (£395m) in damages over claims it unlawfully used another firm's virtual reality technology.
A US court has ordered Facebook and other defendants to pay $500m (£395m) after finding they unlawfully used a firm's virtual reality technology.
Oculus said it was "disappointed" and would appeal the ruling.
Oculus said it was "disappointed" and would appeal against the ruling.
The case threatened to overshadow Facebook's latest results, which showed the social network's profits rose 177%.
The case threatened to overshadow Facebook's latest results, which showed it enjoyed a strong end to the year.
Facebook reported that net income jumped to $10.2bn last year, helped by higher advertising revenues from its nearly two billion users.
Facebook's net profit more than doubled to $3.6bn in the fourth quarter.
Shortly before the results came out, the court awarded Zenimax damages from Facebook, Oculus and other defendants after a three-week trial.
The social network was helped by 53% growth in advertising revenues, and said it was on course to hit two billion users in the first half of 2017.
Zenimax argued in the case that its early innovations in virtual reality were unlawfully copied when Oculus built its own headset, the Rift.
Shortly before the results came out, the court awarded Zenimax damages from Facebook, Oculus and Oculus executives following a three-week trial.
  
Zenimax argued that its early innovations in virtual reality were unlawfully copied when Oculus built its own headset, the Rift.
Palmer Luckey, the founder of Oculus, was also found to have broken a non-disclosure agreement with the firm.
The co-founder of Oculus, Palmer Luckey, was also found to have broken a non-disclosure agreement with the firm.
First, it was revealed he was using some of that money to fund a pro-Donald Trump trolling campaign, which led to Facebook removing him from public view. He didn't even turn up his own company's developer's conference last year.
First, it was revealed he was using some of that money to fund a pro-Donald Trump trolling campaign, which led to Facebook removing him from public view. He didn't even turn up to his own company's developer's conference last year.
  
Virtual reality is only a small part of Facebook's current business, but is seen as important to the firm's strategy over the next 10 years.
  
Most of Facebook's fourth-quarter revenue - which jumped 54% to $27.6bn - came from adverts on its social network.
  
"Facebook had another stellar quarter, delivering record revenue, user growth and profitability, as it rides the shift of advertising to online," said Martin Garner, a senior analyst at CCS Insight.
  
"However it expects advertising growth to slow in 2017, so it expects to be less profitable this year."
  
Other challenges that Facebook face this year include a changing approach to privacy in Europe, an uncertain business landscape in the US and challenges in China, Mr Garner said.
  
The social network has also been widely criticised after some users complained that fake news on its platform had influenced the US presidential election.
  
In a call with analysts on Wednesday, Facebook executives signalled it would tackle the problem through the use of more artificial intelligence.
  
They also said many of Facebook's new users were in India, where telecoms operators had offered free data packages for Facebook traffic.
  
For the full year, Facebook grew its net profit by 177% to $10.2bn.

Brexit: MPs overwhelmingly back Article 50 bill

Wed, 02/01/2017 - 22:45Wed, 02/01/2017 - 22:50
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had imposed a three-line whip - the strongest sanction at his disposal - on his MPs to back the bill.
  
  
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had imposed a three-line whip - the strongest sanction at his disposal - on his MPs to back the bill.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had imposed a three-line whip - the strongest sanction at his disposal - on his MPs to back the bill.
Shadow cabinet members Rachael Maskell and Dawn Butler quit the party's front bench shortly before the vote, in order to defy his orders.
Also, 13 Labour frontbenchers voted against their own party position, apparently without first resigning.
Mr Corbyn said: "Labour MPs voted more than three to one in favour of triggering Article 50. Now the battle of the week ahead is to shape Brexit negotiations to put jobs, living standards and accountability centre stage.
"Labour's amendments are the real agenda. The challenge is for MPs of all parties to ensure the best deal for Britain, and that doesn't mean giving Theresa May a free hand to turn Britain into a bargain-basement tax haven."
One MP was heard to shout "Suicide" when the result of the vote was announced.
Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, seven of whose nine MPs voted against the government, said: "The Tories and Labour have failed future generations today by supporting a hard Brexit.
"Labour's leadership tonight have waved the white flag. They are not an opposition; they are cheerleaders."
MPs will discuss the bill in more detail next week when it reaches its committee stage in the Commons, during which amendments to the government's plans will be discussed.
The SNP's foreign affairs spokesman at Westminster, Alex Salmond, said: "Next week there will be detailed questions and the calibre of the government will be judged by how they respond to the amendments."
Plaid Cymru's Westminster group leader, Hywel Williams, called Labour's stance "deeply disappointing", adding: "This was not a vote on whether to accept the referendum result. It was a vote on whether to endorse the Tories' extreme version of Brexit."
Ken Clarke, the only Conservative MP to defy his party by voting against the bill, said the result was "historic", but the "mood could change" when the "real action" of negotiations with the EU starts.
Earlier, the Commons voted against an SNP amendment aimed at scuppering the bill.
The bill was published last week, after the Supreme Court decided MPs and peers must have a say before Article 50 could be triggered.
It rejected the government's argument that Mrs May had sufficient powers to trigger Brexit without consulting Parliament.
Talks with the EU are expected to last up to two years, with the UK predicted to leave the 28-member organisation in 2019.