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Tunisia survivor 'tried to save fiancee Carly Lovett'

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 19:05Thu, 02/02/2017 - 21:15
The inquest also heard from another survivor, Cheryl Stollery, who told the inquest how her husband John was killed as they both ran from a gunman.
The inquest also heard from other survivors, including those who described coming face-to-face with gunman Seifeddine Rezgui.
The inquest also heard from Mrs Stollery, from Walesby, Nottinghamshire, who described how she and her husband heard gun shots about 11:50 local time when they started running towards the hotel.
The inquest also heard from Cheryl Stollery, from Walesby, Nottinghamshire, who described how she and her husband heard gunshots about 11:50 local time when they started running towards the hotel.
Mrs Stollery stood over her husband for a few seconds before turning her thoughts to finding her son, Matthew.
  
Mrs Stollery told the hearing that while in the booth she saw two men with guns walk past, so she stayed in the booth for about seven minutes until she saw a man she recognised as the site gardener walking by with a little English girl.
Mrs Stollery told the hearing that while in the booth she saw two men with guns walk past, so she stayed in the booth for about seven minutes.
She said: "My thoughts were, 'where is he taking her?' So I came out and asked 'where are you taking her?'"
She then was led to a laundry room by a man she recognised as the site gardener, who helped to hide her.
The hearing was told that he beckoned for her to join him and she was led to a laundry room where others were hiding and where she was covered with duvet covers.
Another survivor, Gina Van Dort, described how she and her husband Chris Dyer, 32, were shot as they crouched behind a car, trying to hide.
Mrs Stollery, who was later reunited with her son Matthew, said she saw no security at the hotel during her stay, and that TV crews were at the scene before the authorities arrived.
In a statement, she said: "I realised I was still alive.
She also described her anger at who she thought was the Tunisian prime minister arriving at the scene.
"I closed my eyes, I stopped breathing - I was pretending to be dead. I remember counting three breaths, and it was over.
She said: "There was no security, no guards, but this man comes, wanting to try and appease you and tell you that it is all okay. How could it be okay, my husband was dead."
"When I couldn't hold my breath any longer, I opened my eyes."
  
Her husband, Chris, from Watford, Hertfordshire, died.
  
Christine Cullen, the wife of Stuart Cullen, who died in the attack, said she saw the gunman throw a bomb towards them.
  
The inquest heard Mrs Cullen felt a pain in her leg and she dropped to the floor.
  
She saw her husband lying on the flood and she tried to stop the blood flow from his neck, she said.
  
"I told him I could not stop the surge of blood. I told him I loved him and he told me he loved me. I knew he was dying," she said.
  
The inquest was told that Rezgui then walked towards the couple, from Lowestoft, Suffolk, and despite Mrs Cullen's cries of "No, No", shot Mr Cullen.
  
Mrs Cullen told the court her life and happiness died the day her husband did.

Ex-HBOS banker 'sold his soul for swag'

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 17:40Thu, 02/02/2017 - 20:10
Six former financiers have been jailed for their part in a bribery and fraud scandal.
A former HBOS banker and five other financiers have been jailed for their part in a £245m loans scandal.
The group carried out a £245m loans scam and spent the cash on prostitutes and luxury holidays.
Lynden Scourfield was sentenced to 11 years and three months, while consultant David Mills was jailed for 15 years.
Former HBOS banker Lynden Scourfield was sentenced to 11 years and three months, while consultant David Mills was jailed for 15 years.
Judge Martin Beddoe said Scourfield "sold his soul" to Mills in exchange for "sex", "bling" and "for swag".
Four other defendants were also convicted and sentenced to between three and a half years and 10 years.
Four other defendants were also convicted and sentenced to between 10 years and three and a half years.
The six were this week found guilty of bribery and defrauding the bank's business customers and shareholders.
  
Scourfield, a former HBOS manager, pleaded guilty to six counts including corruption.
The six were sentenced on Thursday over the scandal which targeted the bank's small business customers.
In exchange for bribes, Scourfield told customers to use a turnaround firm called Quayside Corporate Services.
The group was found to have siphoned off funds and spent the profits on prostitutes, luxury holidays and a range of expensive items.
Mills, 60, who ran Quayside with his wife Alison, bribed Scourfield, 54, with expensive watches, sex parties and, the court heard, "boys' jollies".
Michael Bancroft, 73, was jailed for 10 years; Mark Dobson, 56, another former HBOS manager, was sentenced to four and a half years. The two were jailed on counts including bribery and money laundering.
These were given in exchange for loans which allowed Mills and his associates to access high consultancy fees.
Alison Mills, 51, and John Cartwright, 72, were given three and a half year sentences for money laundering.
The six former financiers were sentenced at Southwark Crown Court on Thursday.
Judge Beddoe said the case involved an "utterly corrupt senior bank manager letting rapaciously greedy people get their hands on vast amounts of bank money and their tentacles into ordinary and honest businesses".
Michael Bancroft, 73, was jailed for 10 years; Mark Dobson, a former HBOS manager, was sentenced to four and a half years.
HBOS, once Britain's biggest mortgage lender under the Halifax and Bank of Scotland brands, was forced to write off £245m related to the conspiracy.
Alison Mills and John Cartwright were given three and a half year sentences.
In exchange for bribes, Scourfield, 54, a former HBOS manager, told customers to use a turnaround firm called Quayside Corporate Services.
The bankers were bribed to push businesses to use Quayside, a business services company which claimed to be experts in running companies.
Mills, 60, who ran Quayside with his wife Alison, bribed Scourfield with expensive watches, sex parties and, the court heard, "boys' jollies".
  
These were given in exchange for loans which allowed Mills and his associates to charge high consultancy fees.
  
Scourfield, who looked after corporate customers at HBOS' branch in Reading, pleaded guilty at an earlier trial last year to six counts including corruption.
  
The bankers were bribed to push businesses to use Quayside, which claimed to be expert in running companies.
The misdeeds took place between 2003-07.
"Their victims were people who were trying to contribute to the economy," said Detective Superintendent Nick John of Thames Valley Police.
  
"They were normal people running small to medium-sized businesses who needed support and instead had their livelihoods, and in many cases, their lives, destroyed."
Judge Martin Beddoe said Scourfield, who had been convicted after pleading guilty at an earlier trial last year, "sold his soul" to Mills in exchange for "sex, for luxury trips ... for bling and for swag".
The CPS special prosecutor, Stephen Rowland, said the case at Southwark Crown Court was one of the largest and most complex the special fraud division had ever prosecuted.
The CPS special prosecutor, Stephen Rowland, said the case was one of the largest and most complex the special fraud division had ever prosecuted.
"It involved millions of documents, a lot of the material we had to look at was electronic and of course in this day and age the capacity for electronic media is huge," he said.
"It involved millions of documents, a lot of the material we had to look at was electronic and of course in this day and age the capacity for electronic media is huge," he said.
  
In exchange for the bribes, Scourfield would require the bank's small business customers to use Quayside, the firm of consultants run by Mills and his wife Alison.
In exchange for the bribes, Scourfield would require the bank's small business customers to use Quayside.
One other defendant, Jonathan Cohen, was acquitted at the trial which finished this week after four months.
HBOS, now owned by Lloyds Banking Group, said: "The trial highlighted criminal actions that bear no reflection on the behaviours of the vast majority of the employees of HBOS at the time or in the group today."
  
One other defendant, Jonathan Cohen, was acquitted at the trial, which finished this week after four months.

Cambridge intake no longer most privately educated

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 18:25Thu, 02/02/2017 - 18:30
Cambridge now has only the ninth most privately educated intake, the Higher Education Statistics Agency figures show.
Cambridge has only the ninth most privately educated intake, the Higher Education Statistics Agency figures show.
The annual figures show the proportion of state school pupils entering UK universities is at a record high.
The figures show the overall proportion of state school pupils entering UK universities has reached a record high.
Dr Sam Lucy, Cambridge's director of admissions, said the university was a "diverse place and nothing like the rumours or typical media stories".
Dr Sam Lucy, Cambridge's director of admissions, said her university was a "diverse place and nothing like the rumours or typical media stories".
Bristol, which gets eight applications for every place, will make offers two grades lower than the standard offer for applicants who have been at schools in the lowest-achieving 40% for A-level results.
Bristol will make offers two grades lower than the standard offer for applicants who have been at schools in the lowest-achieving 40% for A-level results.
The university's pro vice-chancellor, Prof Judith Squires, says this is already making a "hugely encouraging" impact, with the state school intake for this year rising to 64.7%.
The university's pro vice-chancellor, Prof Judith Squires, says its outreach efforts are already making a "hugely encouraging" impact, with the state school intake for this year rising to 64.7%.