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The choices you have if your baby dies

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 15:05Thu, 02/02/2017 - 18:10
Parents Charlotte and Attila Szakacs only had four weeks with their daughter, Evelyn, before a rare chromosomal abnormality led to her death.
Charlotte and Attila Szakacs only had four weeks with their daughter, Evelyn, before a rare chromosomal abnormality led to her death. Yet they were able to spend a further 16 days bonding with her before laying her to rest.
But with help from a hospice, the family were able to spend another 16 days bonding with her after her death, before they laid her to rest.
  
What help is available to parents who have to go through the ordeal of losing their baby?
  
"It helps them to create memories," said Dr Michelle Hills, consultant in paediatric palliative medicine at Martin House.
"It helps them to create memories," says Dr Michelle Hills, consultant in paediatric palliative medicine at Martin House.
Dr Hills said the 16 days Charlotte and Attila decided to have was one of the longer periods she had come across, but the decision was up to each individual family.
Dr Hills says the 16 days Charlotte and Attila decided to have was one of the longer periods she had come across, but the decision was up to each individual family.
"The important thing is there are choices available," she said. "Some people couldn't imagine taking their child home, some people want to stay in hospital, others want to use a hospice.
"The important thing is there are choices available," she says. "Some people couldn't imagine taking their child home, some people want to stay in hospital, others want to use a hospice.
"That is 15 families all affected by that every single day," said Erica Stewart, bereavement support and awareness specialist for the charity. "People don't realise it is that number and we need to address that."
"That is 15 families all affected by that every single day," says Erica Stewart, bereavement support and awareness specialist for the charity. "People don't realise it is that number and we need to address that."
The charity echoed the words of Dr Hills, saying what is important is that each family gets to choose how they want to proceed when a child dies.
The charity echoes the words of Dr Hills, saying what is important is that each family gets to choose how they want to proceed when a child dies.
"It is the approach staff take too," she said. "If they approach a family, tell them something like a cuddle cot has helped others through that time, then it normalises it."
"It is the approach staff take too," she says. "If they approach a family, tell them something like a cuddle cot has helped others through that time, then it normalises it."
"There is an issue as you could find two babies who die on the same day, but there is only one cuddle cot and only one family has that option," said Ms Stewart.
"There is an issue as you could find two babies who die on the same day, but there is only one cuddle cot and only one family has that option," says Ms Stewart.
Ms Stewart said: "A lot of parents feel isolated when they have lost a child and people are too worried to talk to them about it.
Ms Stewart says: "A lot of parents feel isolated when they have lost a child and people are too worried to talk to them about it.

Brexit plan published in government White Paper

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 15:50Thu, 02/02/2017 - 17:20
  
A chart on page 32 of the Brexit White Paper has raised a few eyebrows by claiming UK workers are currently entitled to a generous 14 weeks of annual leave.
  
It comes in a section comparing employment rights in the UK with the rest of the EU.
  
According to the government, the correct figure for someone working five days a week is 28 days.
  
The slip perhaps reflects a possible rush to publish the White Paper with metadata on the file suggesting it was still being worked on at 04:15 GMT.

Labour is calling for a "meaningful vote" that could send the prime minister back to the negotiating table if the deal is deemed unsatisfactory by MPs.
Formal negotiations can begin once the UK has given notice of Brexit under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, which Mrs May has promised to do by the end of March.
On Wednesday evening MPs voted to allow the PM to do this as they backed the European Union Bill by 498 votes to 114.
MPs will discuss the bill in more detail next week when it reaches the committee stage in the Commons, and Labour has vowed to force through amendments.
Hundreds of amendments have already been tabled for debate between Monday and Wednesday, with objectives set out in the government's strategy expected to attract more.
A total of 47 Labour rebels voted against the bill.
A chart on page 32 of the Brexit White Paper has raised a few eyebrows by claiming UK workers are currently entitled to a generous 14 weeks of annual leave.
It comes in a section comparing employment rights in the UK with the rest of the EU.
According to the government, the correct figure for someone working five days a week is 28 days.
The slip perhaps reflects a possible rush to publish the White Paper with metadata on the file suggesting it was still being worked on at 04:15 GMT.
Shadow cabinet members Rachael Maskell and Dawn Butler quit the party's front bench shortly before Wednesday evening's vote, and in total, 13 Labour frontbenchers voted against their own party position which was to support the bill.
Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, shadow chancellor John McDonnell said other parties had also been divided on the issue, with two of the Liberal Democrats' nine MPs abstaining despite orders to oppose the bill.
Mr McDonnell said a decision on whether frontbench rebels could remain in their jobs would be taken "in due course", and that the atmosphere in his party was "one of mutual respect", with determination to oppose a "reckless Brexit".
He said Labour "may look divided" but would unite after the government triggers official negotiations under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty while "the Tory Party will split apart".
Mr McDonnell also said shadow home secretary Diane Abbott had missed the vote because she "wasn't very well".
The Brexit bill was published last week, after the Supreme Court decided MPs and peers must have a say before Article 50 could be triggered.
It rejected the government's argument that Mrs May had sufficient powers to trigger Brexit without consulting Parliament.
Iain Watson, BBC political correspondent, said a "sizeable" Labour rebellion could grow further if amendments were not passed.
The SNP, Plaid Cymru and seven out of nine Liberal Democrats opposed the government's bill, alongside Tory Ken Clarke.
The SNP's foreign affairs spokesman at Westminster, Alex Salmond, said there would be "detailed questions" about the bill during its next stage.
He said "the calibre of the government will be judged by how they respond to the amendments".
Mr Clarke, the only Conservative MP to defy his party by voting against the bill, said the result was "historic", but the "mood could change" when the "real action" of negotiations with the EU starts.
Exit talks with the EU are expected to last up to two years, with the UK predicted to leave the 28-member organisation in 2019.

Iraq lawyer Phil Shiner struck off over misconduct

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 14:55Thu, 02/02/2017 - 16:55
He did not attend the hearing, having written to the tribunal to say he was unwell and could not afford to pay for a defence lawyer.
Colonel James Coote, who was a major based in Basra, said the accusations brought by Mr Shiner would inevitably have left emotional scars.
  
"We can't turn the clock back," he said. "Nothing will undo the decade or so that my soldiers, their families and indeed my family have been through," he said.
  
"Personally speaking it has been difficult, but I feel now that a chapter is certainly behind us - clearly there is still one chapter open which we will not comment on now - but I think certainly it has been a very harrowing experience."
  
Mr Shiner did not attend the hearing, having written to the tribunal to say he was unwell and could not afford to pay for a defence lawyer.
The tribunal heard about how British military personnel had been affected by his actions in "cold-calling" the family members of alleged Iraqi victims.
  
Army Colonel James Coote, who was a major stationed in Basra, said the false claims made against British troops at the Battle of Danny Boy in 2004 had been "extremely stressful and demoralising".
  
  
The Iraq Historic Allegations Team will review cases brought by Mr Shiner and a make a decision over which should no longer be pursued.

Bank of England sharply raises 2017 growth outlook

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 14:25Thu, 02/02/2017 - 15:45
The Bank said the improved forecast was partly the result of higher spending and investment contained in Chancellor Philip Hammond's Autumn Statement.
The Bank also made a striking forecast about the savings rate, which it expects to fall to 4%, the lowest rate since the early 1960s.
The Bank has been criticised for being too gloomy when it drastically cut its growth forecast after June's vote in favour of Brexit.
The raised growth forecast follows much criticism levelled at the Bank for being too gloomy when it drastically cut its growth forecast after June's vote in favour of Brexit.
Since then the Bank has been forced to upgrade its forecasts for growth.
  
The Bank also credited stronger growth in the US and Europe, rising stock markets and the greater availability of credit for households, for its more optimistic outlook for the UK economy.
The Bank said the latest, improved forecast was partly the result of higher spending and investment contained in Chancellor Philip Hammond's Autumn Statement.
  
It also credited stronger growth in the US and Europe, rising stock markets and the greater availability of credit for households, for its more optimistic outlook for the UK economy.
It predicts "a significant fall in the saving ratio over the next three years as consumers take time to adjust spending growth to weaker income flows". The savings rate is expected to fall to 4%.
It predicts "a significant fall in the saving ratio over the next three years as consumers take time to adjust spending growth to weaker income flows". The savings rate is expected to fall to 4%, the lowest rate since records began in the early 1960s.
"Consumers have not been affected by the uncertainty around Brexit." However, he added that although the Bank had raised its growth forecast, this "doesn't mean the referendum is without consequence".
"Consumers have not been affected by the uncertainty around Brexit."
  
However, he added that although the Bank had raised its growth forecast, this "doesn't mean the referendum is without consequence".
"The thing that we missed is the strength of consumer spending and consumer confidence associated with that," he said. "After an initial wobble in terms of consumer surveys... it bounced back pretty quickly,"
"The thing that we missed is the strength of consumer spending and consumer confidence associated with that," he said. "After an initial wobble in terms of consumer surveys... it bounced back pretty quickly."